Growing Calendar

  • January
  • February
  • March
  • April
  • May
  • June
  • July
  • August
  • September
  • October
  • November
  • December
  • In the Garden

    • Protect evergreens shrubs and trees from winter cold burn by applying an anti-desiccant spray, such Wilt Stop® to leaves
    • New shrubs and trees may be installed if the soil is not frozen
    • Plants that were planted in early winter may “heave” up out of the ground as the ground freezes and contracts.  Check plants periodically and replant any that whose roots are exposed as soon as possible
    • Be careful not to remove heavily accumulated wet snow on shrubs and trees.  The action of pushing the snow off may cause more serious damage to plant than if they have left alone

    Around the House

    • Maintain houseplants with adequate water and light during the winter months.
  • In the Garden

    • New shrubs and trees may be installed if the soil is not frozen
    • Plants that were planted in early winter may “heave” up out of the ground as the ground freezes and contracts. Check plants periodically and replant any that whose roots are exposed as soon as possible.
    • Be careful not to remove heavily accumulated wet snow on shrubs and trees. The action of pushing the snow off may cause more serious damage to plant than if they have left alone.
    • February is an excellent time to thin boxwood shrubs.  This is done by “plucking” 6-inch sprigs of boxwood randomly to thin out dense growth. This improves light and air penetration for healthier plants.

    Fruits & Vegetables

    • Vegetable and flower seeds are available at garden centers for seed start indoor for spring planting
    • Seed may be ordered my mail or online from hundreds of seed suppliers with many rare and interesting offerings
    • Roses should be pruned during the later part of the month.  Normally, the date of February 22nd (the birth date of George Washington) is often used as the date to start pruning
    • Late February is a good time to apply dormant oil or other dormant sprays to kill wintering-over insects eggs or disease spores that may still be on plants.

    Around the House

    • Maintain houseplants with adequate water and light during the winter months.
  • In the Garden

    • Springtime arrives half-way through this month
    • This is the time to start pruning many shrubs and trees

    Fruits & Vegetables

    • Early edible plants are available in dormant form, ready to plant
    • Excellent time to plant:  asparagus crowns, horseradish roots, garlic bulbs, onions sets ,strawberry crowns, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries,  grapes, fruit trees, seed potatoes and many other edibles

    For the Lawn

    • March is the month to apply preemergent herbicides (crabgrass and broadleaf weed preventers) to turf grass lawns

    Around the House

    • Maintain houseplants with adequate water and light during the winter months.
  • In the Garden

    • Excellent time to plant shrubs, trees and perennials
    • Best time to prune spring-blooming shrubs and trees is when they are through blooming
    • Summer annual flowers may be planted in the garden as early as the last week of April

    Fruits & Vegetables

    • Early edible plants are available in dormant form, ready to plant
    • Excellent time to plant:  asparagus crowns, horseradish roots, garlic bulbs, onions sets ,strawberry crowns, raspberries, blackberries, blueberries,  grapes, fruit trees, seed potatoes and many other edibles
    • Summer vegetable plants, such as tomatoes and peppers, may be planted in the garden as early as the last week of April

    For the Lawn

    • Crabgrass preemergent herbicides may be applied up to the second week of April
    • Japanese beetle grubs emerge from hibernation and become active. Apply grub control this month.
    • Grass should be cut no shorter than 3 inches high
    • Spring lawn fertilizer may be applied any time this month

    Around the House

    • Maintain houseplants with adequate water and light during the winter months
    • The amount of daylight increases in April.  Houseplant activity increases. Resume fertilizing plants every other week.
    • April is an excellent time to replant and transplant houseplants
    • Check African Violets for Cyclamen mites
  • In the Garden

    • Excellent time to plant shrubs, trees, annuals and perennials
    • Prune spring-blooming shrubs and trees is when they are through blooming
    • All summer annual flowers may be planted in the garden
    • May is an excellent time to take cuttings for propagation

    Fruits & Vegetables

    • All summer vegetable plants, such as tomatoes and peppers, may be set out in the garden.

    For the Lawn

    • Post emergent weed killers may be used to kill weeds which are up and growing
    • Lawns should be cut regularly, no shorter than 3 inches in height

    Around the House

    • May is an excellent time to replant and transplant houseplants
  • In the Garden

    • Excellent time to plant shrubs, trees, annuals and perennials
    • All summer annual flowers may be planted in the garden
    • June is an excellent time to take semi-hard cuttings for propagation
    • Many damaging insects hatch from eggs at the end of May. Spraying for these insects should begin around the second week of June
    • Preventive sprays for plant fungi should begin in early June. This pertains to all plants, including shrubs, trees, annuals, perennials, edible plants and lawns.

    Fruits & Vegetables

    • All summer vegetable plants, such as tomatoes and peppers, may still be set out in the garden
    • Harvest first crops of blueberries, strawberries, cherries and early peaches

    For the Lawn

    • Post emergent weed killers may be used to kill weeds which are up and growing
    • Lawns should be cut regularly, no shorter than 3 inches in height
    • Water requirements may increase because of rapid growth of turf grass and higher temperatures

    Around the House

    • Maintain houseplants with adequate water and light during the winter months
    • Insect pest increase in June.  Apply pesticides that are approved for houseplant pests and for use indoors
  • In the Garden

    • Good time to plant shrubs, trees and perennials
    • All summer annual flowers may be planted in the garden
    • High summer heat begins. 
    • Be sure to maintain at least a 2-inch thick layer of mulch around all garden plants to help conserve soil moisture

    Fruits & Vegetables

    • Apply ample water to vegetable and fruiting plants
    • Apply fertilizer to plants to maintain health, growth and maturity
    • Harvest peaches, plums, nectarines, pears and early apples

    For the Lawn

    • Post emergent weed killers may be used to kill weeds which are up and growing
    • Lawns should be cut regularly, no shorter than 3 inches in height
    • Water requirements may increase because of rapid growth of turf grass and higher temperatures
    • Apply one inch of water once a week in the summer – University of Maryland Extension
    • Do not apply fertilizer to lawns in summer, except Zoysia grass lawns

    Around the House

    • Maintain houseplants with adequate water and light during the winter months
    • Insect pest activity increases in June.  Apply pesticides that are approved for houseplant pests and for use indoors
  • In the Garden

    • Good time to plant shrubs, trees and perennials
    • All summer annual flowers may be planted in the garden
    • Be sure to maintain at least a 2-inch thick layer of mulch around all garden plants to help conserve soil moisture

    Fruits & Vegetables

    • Apply ample water to vegetable and fruiting plants
    • Apply fertilizer regularly to plants to maintain health, growth and maturity
    • Harvest peaches, apples, and pears

    For the Lawn

    • Post emergent weed killers may be used to kill weeds which are up and growing
    • Lawns should be cut regularly, no shorter than 3 inches in height
    • Water requirements may increase because of rapid growth of turf grass and higher temperatures
    • Apply one inch of water once a week in the summer – University of Maryland Extension
    • Do not apply fertilizer to lawns in summer, except Zoysia grass lawns

    Around the House

    • Maintain houseplants with adequate water and light during the winter months
    • Insect pest activity increase in June. Apply pesticides that are approved for houseplant pests and for use indoors
  • In the Garden

    • Plant pansies, violas, mums, oriental cabbage and kale for fall color
    • Plant fall bulbs like tulips, daffodils and crocus for super garden color next April
    • Great time to install new shrubs and trees in garden
    • Feed deciduous shrubs, trees and perennials before they go dormant
    • Continue to provide adequate water to garden plants. Summer’s not over yet

    Fruits & Vegetables

    • Harvest summer fruits and vegetables – The reward for your hard work and optimism.
    • Plant new cool-season summer vegetable transplants or from seed
    • Continue to control summer insect and disease pests; new organic pesticides are safe and really work
    • Kill remaining weeds now; weed killers won’t work when the weather turns colder

    For the Lawn

    • September is a very busy time for doing important lawn care tasks
    •  Best time to plant a new turf grass lawn or to reseed the one you already have. 
    •  A great time to install a lawn with established grass sod.
    • Apply lime to soil if a pH test shows your lawn soil’s pH reading is below 6.0 on the pH scale
    • Aerate the lawn soil with a core aerator to reduce compaction in hard or clay soils
    • Fall feeding with a nutrient-balanced fall lawn fertilizer super important – University of Maryland Extension
    • Time to put down the fall application of Milky Spore granules (spring, summer fall for 2 years and you’re done).
    • Put down the fall application of Corn Gluten fertilizer/weed preventer.  Reseed early and wait to put down the Corn Gluten after all of the grass has germinated.
    • Continue to feed pond fish until the water temperature drops to 55°F.

    Around the House

    • Days are getting noticeably shorter, so houseplants will start to drop leaves to compensate for the lack of light and will slow down their activity accordingly
    • Check citrus and houseplants for insects if they have just been moved indoors.
    • Pesky tiny flies in your kitchen? Try putting a fruitfly trap in the fruit bowl and they will all be gone soon
  • In the Garden

    • You can still plant pansies, violas, oriental cabbage and kale for fall color.  Mums are about done blooming
    • You can still plant fall bulbs like tulips, daffodils and crocus.  Plant early while the selection and quality of bulbs are at their best
    • Great time to install new shrubs and trees in garden
    • Weather’s getting cooler.  Good time to transplant shrubs, trees and perennials from one location to another

    Fruits & Vegetables

    • Summer fruits are at their peak – You should be able to harvest some baby lettuce by month’s end
    • Cool-season vegetable must be planted from seedling transplants – a bit late to plant from seed
    • Insect pests will start to be less, but watch out for wildlife such as rabbits, deer, groundhog and squirrels
    • If you planted fall-bearing raspberries, you will now be able to see why they make October so special

    For the Lawn

    • Still a good time to seed or reseed a lawn; early cold weather may slow germination (add an extra week)
    • Still a great time to install a lawn with established grass sod.
    • You can still apply that fall feeding with a nutrient-balanced lawn fertilizer
    • You can still apply the fall application of Milky Spore granules or Corn Gluten

    Around the House

    • Apply Bayer Advance® Systemic Houseplant Insecticide to houseplants or outdoor planted containers to control summer insect pest (one application controls insects for up to 8 weeks)
    • Continue to apply a water-soluble fertilizer, i.e., Miracle-gro, every other week to flowering plants in containers
    • Check citrus and houseplants for insects if they have just been moved indoors.
    • Pesky tiny flies in your kitchen? Try putting a fruitfly trap in the fruit bowl and they will all be gone soon
    • Put out fresh wild bird seed in feeders for local and migrating birds
    • Put up suet cages and animal suet for wild birds
    • Plant or reawaken dormant Amaryllis bulbs for the holidays by  providing warmth, water and light
  • In the Garden

    • You can still plant pansies, violas, oriental cabbage and kale for fall winter color
    • You can still plant fall bulbs like tulips, daffodils and crocus.  Bulb selection may be limited
    • Good time to install new shrubs and trees in garden
    • The first frost of the year normally occurs during the second week of November.  Summer annuals are finished.
    • Good time to transplant shrubs, trees and perennials from one location to another

    Fruits & Vegetables

    • You should be able to start harvesting mature lettuces and other cool-season greens
    • Rabbits, deer, groundhog and squirrels will be the prime pests on edible plants through early spring
    • Start putting up enclosures that will help insulate tender plants such as figs from winter cold damage

    For the Lawn

    • You can still apply that fall feeding with a nutrient-balanced lawn fertilizer
    • You can still apply the fall application of Milky Spore granules or Corn Gluten

    Around the House

    • Check citrus and houseplants for insects if they have just been moved indoors
    • Many pests will be moving indoors to escape the cold.  Look out for mice and the Brown Marmorated Stinkbug and install traps to control them
    • Potted plants, such as Amaryllis, Christmas and Thanksgiving cacti, Cyclamen and Poinsettia are now in bloom for the holidays
    • Live and cut Christmas trees are available for holiday celebrations indoors
  • In the Garden

    • Protect evergreens shrubs and trees from winter cold burn by applying an anti-dessicant spray, such Wilt Stop® to leaves
    • You can still plant fall bulbs like tulips, daffodils and crocus if any are available
    • New shrubs and trees may be installed if the soil is not frozen
    • Cold-sensitive evergreens, such as Camellias and Dwarf English Boxwoods can be protected from winter damage if covered over loosely with cut needled evergreen boughs
    • Evergreens such as conical arborvitae, can be wrapped with twine in a spiral wrap that gathers the branches in to prevent accumulation of snow that may seriously splay out the branches

    Fruits & Vegetables

    • Cool-season cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower and Brussels Sprouts may be harvest at this time.
    • Rabbits, deer, groundhog and squirrels will be the prime pests on edible plants through early spring
    • Put up enclosures that will help insulate tender plants such as figs from winter cold damage

    For the Lawn

    • Retire lawn mowers to the garage for the winter.  Remember to put fuel preservative in the gasoline tank to keep the fuel viable over the winter

    Around the House

    • Potted plants, such as Amaryllis, Christmas and Thanksgiving cacti, Cyclamen and Poinsettia are now in bloom for the holidays
    • Live Christmas trees (those with roots) are not conditioned to stay very long in a warm environment in winter.  Limit their indoor stays to no more than 7 days before placing them back outdoors
    • Keep you cut Christmas trees well-watered, as they may become a fire hazard if they become too dry