Seasonal planning: Get your seed schedule down

Spring is right around the corner, which means it’s time to start your garden. The best way to do this is to figure out whether you’re going to plant starter seeds indoors and then transfer them outside, or simply sow the seeds outside in the first place. No matter how you plan on starting your seeds, here are some tips to help you achieve a beautiful spring and summer garden.

Choose your plants

Before you can start planting, you need to pick out your seeds. Homestead Gardens has you covered! We carry an assortment of non-GMO seeds, including heirloom, certified organic and open-pollinated varieties. That means you’ll have many to choose from!

Timing is everything

The first step to knowing when to plant seeds is to figure out when the last frost in your area historically is. Not sure when that would be? Here’s a nifty map for your reference. Here in Maryland, the last frost typically occurs between April 5th and April 11th depending on where you are. After you’ve determined this, you’ll want to read your seed packet to see how many days the seeds need to germinate.

Looking for an easier way? The Old Farmer’s Almanac has a seed calculator to give you guidance on when to plant your seeds. Simply choose the city closest to you in the list, and a year-round calendar will show you when to plant seeds indoors, when to plant seeds outdoors and when to harvest. 

Ensure proper nutrition

Those little seeds need a lot of nutrients in order to grow into those lovely flowers, vegetables and fruits. You’ll want to choose a good soil mix that is lightweight, clean and sterile without insects, fungus or weed. If planting directly in the ground outdoors, we recommend Homestead Gardens’ own blend – Maryland Select All-Purposed Potting Soil. This ready-to-use mix is specially formulated for Maryland gardens. However, ff starting your seeds indoors first, plant in Espoma Organic Seed Starter Potting Soil Mix to give your seeds the best start.

Expert tip: Be sure not to use fertilizer on seedlings until they have sprouted. If you do, it could hinder the seeds’ initial growth.

When you’re ready to start your indoor garden, stop in to Homestead Gardens for all your needs.

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